Grief and Gratitude

I am tired of writing about grief because I am tired of grieving. I have been here before, teetering at a crossroads. I have learned some things over the years, like the importance of letting myself feel whatever it is I am feeling. I have learned the difference between honoring my feelings and wallowing inside of them. I have learned (though I don’t claim to be perfect at it) to notice when it is time to make a conscious shift in perspective—when doing so doesn’t mean pushing away feelings that need to be felt, but rather, slowly shedding what is ready to fall away.

More than one person has reflected my experience back to me, describing my emotional state like that of a wounded animal. I have been battered, shell-shocked, shaking with fear, and hence too timid—and far too exhausted—to leave my den. But I have begun to sniff the outdoors; to circle the perimeter before crawling back inside.

I still carry my grief with me: somedays, like today, I carry it on my chest like a ten-ton weight; but yesterday I carried it in my back pocket and laughed like I haven’t laughed in weeks.

I know healing, like life, is not a straight trajectory. I know not to get too attached when the days feel easier, just like I know not to give up when the days feel unbearable. I carry a strength that I have built, one challenge at a time, brick by brick by brick, and it will get me through anything.

I carry fear and rage, but I also carry joy. These days, it mostly lives in my back pocket like yesterday’s grief, but I know it’s there. I can feel it like a seed, precious, with an entire garden living inside its shell.

heart seed

I want to water it with gratitude and watch it bloom:

I am grateful to be running again, slow and heavy, but running nonetheless.

I am grateful for all the women who, because they have been through what I have been through—are going through what I am going through—understand even when I don’t have the energy to explain.

I am grateful for this week’s sun, hot and bright and luring me out of my skin.

I am grateful for the people who have never waned in their presence and support; and for the people who have shown up unexpectedly with their presence and support.

I am grateful for my family’s tree-planting ceremony; and for our new tree (a
sweetly-sad looking specimen that will blossom into a beautiful weeping cherry); and for our meditating frog that makes me smile every time I look at him. (I’m not sure why I think it’s a him, since I usually go with “her,” but I do.)
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I am grateful that my children love each other the way that I always wanted a sibling to love.

I am grateful for my home, which wraps its walls around me like a cocoon.

I am grateful for Josh, my love, for loving me still. For loving me more than ever.

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This Week’s Digest

I have a bad habit of torturing myself with what has come and gone. It often sounds like this: “Last week at this time, I was waking up on vacation; now I’m…” “Last month at this time, I was getting ready [for something wonderful]; now it’s over.” I’ve done a fair amount of looking back during my breast cancer treatment, not always to torture myself, but rather to reflect on and take note of all the changes in my life and in my body.

Lying in bed this morning, my mind did a lot of, “Last week at this time…” and I’m happy to say, that today, I came out on top.

Last week at this time, I was struggling to get out of bed mornings and sometimes not getting out of bed much at all. Now, even though I admit it often feels hard upon waking to face my life and my day, I do get up, every single time, and once I do, I feel okay. Sometimes even joyful. And either way, more solid.

Last week at this time, I was barely moving my left arm, never lying on my left
Image 1side, and wary of hugs. Now I am still tender on and a bit protective of my left side, but
I can reach and lift and hug and carry again.

Last week at this time, I was still more exhausted post-surgery than I was through chemo, and when I got out of bed, it was to spend most of my day on the couch. This week, I went for three, two-mile runs. I also went to the farmer’s market and bowling in Shelburne Falls and to a school assembly and out to lunch with friends, and this weekend, I am going to the mountains with my family.

Last week, I cried in my radiation oncologist’s waiting room, so desperate to be done with all of this, so desperate for things to be a little easier. This week, I took it in stride that I have to go to Boston (a couple of hours away) for another opinion about how to proceed with radiation. (My radiation oncologist is torn about whether or not to radiate my lymph nodes. Torn about whether the risk that would bring to my heart and lungs outweighs the risk of cancer recurrence. I’m trying not to think about that too much—that those are my options: either potentially damaging my heart and lungs or potentially dealing with breast cancer again.) And I am taking it in stride that if I radiate my lymph nodes, and if my heart is too close to those nodes, I may have to do my radiation in Boston (where they have a machine for better protecting the heart). Getting treatment in Boston would mean figuring out how to spend most of summer there since I can’t (or won’t) drive four hours every day for six weeks of radiation.

Last week at this time, I was physically and emotionally stopped. Now, I am on the move again, slowly returning to a life outside the confines of my home and my head.

Approaching the Light

Everything stops me these days. Stops me from getting out of bed. Stops me from writing. From answering the phone, returning a text, taking my vitamins, eating something green. Everything either takes too much effort or too much courage.

But I think I’m getting better. No, I know I’m getting better, because on Saturday, Image 4I spent the whole day enjoying (for real, not for-fake, enjoying) my daughter’s 7th birthday (we now have two rabbits: Coco and Peppermint). And even though I spent most of Sunday back under the covers, on Monday, I started taking my vitamins again. (On Tuesday I started taking my Tamoxifen). And yesterday, even though I woke up and watched TV for 3 hours straight, for the first time since my surgery I ALSO did something while I watched; rather than simply lying like a still, stopped blob on the couch, I worked on a photo project on my computer.

And then, for the first time since my surgery, I went for a real walk (not a sick person’s, let me amble up and down the street, so I don’t get bed-sores kind of walk, but a real walk, all the way to my local hospital (Cooley Dickinson) and back, where I’ll be doing radiation. (And where, by the way, I met my radiation oncologist, Dr. Bornstein, who I absolutely, positively adore. How did I get so lucky with these amazing practitioners?)

But before I knew how amazing Dr. Bornstein is, I sat in the waiting room and cried like a damned fragile cancer patient. The type of cancer patient that made the nurse especially kind and gentle, and I loved her for that, but I also wanted to scream, “I just started being this fragile! I’m NOT USUALLY this fragile!”

“I just don’t want to do this,” I explained to my husband when he put his arm around me in the waiting room. All these months, the only other time I’ve cried in a doctor’s office was 2 days after my diagnosis, when the surgeon told me I’d need a mastectomy. Since then, I’ve been green with nausea and dizzy with fatigue, but I’ve never been like this. Never depressed. Mostly, I’ve even been chipper. “You’re in awfully good spirits for someone who just had a terrible first round of chemo and is back for more,” my oncologist commented back in November. And I was. I was in genuinely fine spirits, month after month after month of breast cancer treatment.

But everything stops me these days. Not in a “Let me breath and appreciate the moment” kind of way. In a “How does one go on?” kind of way. In a “Oh my god, every single tiny thing is so fucking overwhelming, how can I even begin to wrap my head around… anything? Taking my vitamins much less taking the time to prepare anything healthier and more time-consuming than a bowl of yogurt or a piece of toast with peanut butter much less taking care of my children? And how about the stacks of mail and how will I ever manage a career again or the fact that I feel six years old inside: small and frightened and utterly dependent and wanting to be loved and feeling so filled up for a fleeting moment when someone shows up just to love me (thank you, oh my goodness, thank you, to those of you who have been showing up with a call, a card, an email, a visit, just to love me a little); but not being able to love myself and pushing people away for not loving me enough or in the right way and then feeling abandoned and angry and hurt and: Stop.

Not everything stops me anymore. I am getting better.

At today’s doctor’s appointment, I laughed in the waiting room. And during my appointment, Dr. Parikh (my beloved plastic surgeon; I still can’t believe I, one, have a plastic surgeon, and two, adore my plastic surgeon) said I seemed better. He said my eyes sparkled with life again. Then, after he examined me, he rejoiced at my recovery and gave me the “all clear” to start radiation. (“Yay?” Yes, “Yay,” because the sooner I start radiation, the sooner I finish.) He gave me the all clear to lift my left arm (gently, slowly, to a certain point); to lift more than a half gallon of milk if my body feels like it can lift more than a half gallon of milk; to run a mile if my body feels like it can run a mile.

greener-pastures
He gave me the all clear to stop stopping. And I am ready. Ready (I hope, I hope, I hope) to get out of bed, out of my head, out of my house, out of this depression.