From the Other Side of Surgery

The last ten days has felt like a trip through multiple time zones. I have moved in and out of emotional states quicker than I could land in any of them. I have also moved in and out of full anesthesia, followed by regular doses of pain meds; so that, coupled with the time-zones-slash-emotional-states has left me blurry and, to be honest, grasping for solid ground.

But let me back up and share, first, that all-in-all, I am feeling much better than expected post-surgery. Certainly physically. I have minimal pain. Some discomfort, especially at night, but nothing I (pain-wimp) can’t handle. I also have more mobility than expected. After three nights of sleeping half-sitting up, I can now fully recline and even lie on my right side. I have been warned by others who have traveled this road to be very careful. To do less than I think I can do. To not reach for that glass in the cupboard nor comb my children’s hair. Though because I didn’t have a double mastectomy, I can do both of those things with my right arm. Mostly, though, I lie in bed or on the couch and (I admit) watch a tremendous amount of TV. I haven’t been able to make much sense of my book. And until today, I haven’t been able to face the blank page to write. I have gone for one or two (very) short walks each day. (Starting in the hospital when I walked to the end of the hall and back. Who knew how exhausting that could be.) And tonight I ventured out for my first big event: the breast cancer support group at the Cancer Connection. Just being in that room made a difference in my emotional state. Yesterday was a dark-cloud kind of day. Today I felt some light.

But let me back up again. To my family’s return from Arizona. (Oh what an amazing trip. Oh how I long to be back there.) After months of dreading the arrival of my surgery date, all I wanted was for it to come already, so I could stop the waiting, the anxious, anxious waiting. By Tuesday night, I was almost excited to wake up the next day and go to the hospital. Relieved (to finally be done with the waiting) is a more accurate description, but relieved almost to the point of excitement. And I was calm. I composed a blog post in my head that I never did write; it went something like this:

I am not carrying fear to the hospital tomorrow. I am ready. I will be thinking about: (And here I posted, in my head, a series of pictures, which perhaps I will post, for real, tomorrow, when it is no longer the middle of the night: the Arizona red rocks; my closest Northampton women friends gathered around a dinner table with me two nights before surgery; some kind of adorable picture of my children; perhaps a bird being carried by the wind.)

I took my children to school Wednesday morning. I came home with just enough time to watch the slew of selfie-videos texted by my beloved Brooklyn crew. And then I drove with Josh to the hospital, with Maggie following behind in her car and my parents behind her. I met what turned out to be a most remarkable surgical Image 1team. I might have made inappropriate jokes as the drugs hit and they wheeled me to the OR. I have a vague recollection of referencing Grey’s Anatomy and warning the docs to be on better behavior than the ones on TV. I also remember a giddiness, like I wanted to hang out and drink beer together. And then, moments after taking in the bright lights and metal carts and thinking, “So this is what an operating room looks like,” I was out.

In the hours after I woke up, I remember a few things: eating left over pasta with Josh and thinking it was delicious. Not being able to open my eyes, they were so heavy with fatigue, so talking with closed lids to the medical people who cycled in and out to check on me. When someone checked my bandages, making the conscious decision not to open my eyes because I was too terrified to see my new body; wondering whether I would ever be able to look. Several hours later, wanting to look; looking; and feeling okay—and then feeling such tremendous relief about feeling okay.

All this happened sometime between Wednesday evening and Thursday afternoon. By Thursday night, I was home. By Friday night, my friend Jenae was here for the weekend (by my side along with Maggie, Josh and my parents); and my kids were gone for the weekend (having the time of their lives with my in-laws and nine of their cousins).

And I spent the next several days continuing to travel through multiple time zones and emotional states. I’ve done a tremendous amount of grasping. Wanting to be back in Arizona with my family. Wanting another taste of that giddy feeling I had in the OR; another taste of the relief I felt taking my kids to school on Wednesday morning, knowing I would soon be on the other side of surgery. Wanting time to stop moving so fast. Wanting my children to keep being children. Wanting my friends and family to keep showering me with love. Wanting to land in a time zone, in an emotional state, on my own two feet, long enough to catch my breath.

Today, Tuesday, I think I finally felt some ground beneath my toes.

Let’s see what tomorrow brings.

Grasping and Being

How easy it is for the grasping to sneak back in—like weeds pushing up through cracks in pavement, but less lovely. Still, I am trying to slow down enough to notice both (the grasping and the patches of green in grey cement).

With the grasping, I am trying: “Look. There’s that anxiety again; the wanting-things-to-be-a-certain-way thinking,” and to keep walking, letting each go as a passing thought that is not-me.

plant concreteWith the weeds, I am trying: “Look! Look at the patches of green in grey cement!” and to bend down and notice the tendrils of stem and leaf reaching toward sky. An image of hope that, had I not slowed down enough to see, would be crushed under foot.

Today is our last day in this wide-open Arizona sky. Our last day surrounded by red rock and hours upon hours with nothing to do but be.

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I am proud of myself for not grasping too hard. It is not uncommon for me to leave before it is time to leave: to inventory all that will soon be “lost”; to mentally transport myself back to the to-do lists waiting for me at home before I actually am home. So I am proud that this morning, when I woke up counting the number of hours until we leave this place (22) and the number of days until my surgery (5), I didn’t crawl down the dark and endless hole lined with accompanying thoughts. Instead, I did what needed to be done (return the pre-registration call from the hospital; leave a message for my oncologist); and what I knew would help (watch my thoughts like an outside observer watching the passing clouds; listen again to IMG_1043_2Belleruth Naparstek’s pre-surgery relaxation CD); and then what I wanted to do (write; play pool—and in the pool— with my family; soak up every last minute of this glorious place and time).

Still, I am aware of how utterly precarious this “just being” is. Sitting here now, I feel the precariousness in my bones; feel how easy for the “just being” to turn into yet another form of grasping—of me trying desperately, desperately to sink into presence. It is like walking uphill at the Grand Canyon. Stunningly beautiful, and so damn hard.

But also an absolute must. (After all, I don’t want to miss out on a “once in a lifetime” experience!) And so, I keep coming back: to this moment, to the passing clouds, to a splash of green pushing through concrete.

Middle-of-The-Night Me

I don’t sleep like I used to. It’s not my typical insomnia of hours to fall asleep (though that happens, too). It’s restless night after restless night, many of them with hours of being awake while the rest of the country sleeps. It’s night after night of facing those middle-of-the-night thoughts. I hate those middle-of-the-night thoughts. I know not to take them too seriously. Know that everything feels darker in middle-of-the-night darkness. And yet, dark they (the thoughts) continue to be. Dark and heavy and bleak and stressful and sad.

They are not the inspiring, “What will I do with my one wild and precious life?” thoughts. They are the daunting and hopeless, “What will I do with my one wild and precious life?” thoughts. (On a brighter side, I laughed out loud this morning as I read what this writer had to say about her insomniac thinking.)

Earlier this week, I spent the night in a hotel room with 3 of my dear friends while 8 of our Imagechildren slept in hotel beds next door. I went to bed joyful about our April break getaway—emotionally filled up by watching our kids thrill over the adventure; filled up by talking for hours on hotel beds with girlfriends. In the morning, I got out of bed joyful about the day ahead—more hours of thrilling adventure; more time with girlfriends. So why, with joy on each end, does the middle-of-the-night still bring such suffering? Why, on this particular night, did I spend hours listening to the rain outside and the heavy breathing inside and the incessant voice in my head bringing up one dark thought after the next? Some detail about work: how did I not realize until now what I should have done but did not do? A changed friendship: would we ever get back to what seems lost? My upcoming surgery… and panic panic panic about everything having to do with that.

I spent this middle of the night thinking about this article and this blog post about the medical and emotional travails of reconstruction. About what feels like the looming loss of my body and of my comfort (again, physical; emotional). About what feels like a looming turning point that will forever divide my life into “before surgery” and “after surgery.”

“Before cancer” and “after cancer” carry a very different kind of significance, by the way. I was telling someone recently that though I would never have chosen breast cancer, neither would I wish it away at this point. There has been so much learning and growing and opening that I wouldn’t want to miss out on.

I do, however, wish this surgery weren’t happening. Will I feel differently somewhere on the other side? Will there be new learning and growing and opening that I am happy to receive in exchange for my breast?

I had expected the sleep to get easier on the other side of chemo. Had hoped that restful nights would seep back in just as the fatigue seeped out. (And the fatigue has seeped out! Two weeks ago, I never would have managed that 31-hour wonderful whirlwind getaway with 3 girlfriends and 8 children!) But last week, my oncologist said that no, my sleep issues are not because of the chemo—not the kind of direct result, anyway, that will improve now that the drugs are leaving my system. Rather, my sleep issues are a result of my chemo-induced menopause, and hence they are symptoms that just may stick around. (For the rest of my life? I am becoming my mother in ways I would rather not become my mother.)

Back from my 31 hours April break getaway, I did not wake up in a hotel room with friends, and perhaps that is why I woke up feeling sad. Because there was no immediate distraction to shake off the middle of the night. Though I did sleep more, I also dreamed of men with guns taking over my village. I dreamed what I used to dream again and again as a child but haven’t dreamed for years—of trying (desperately trying, such panic and fear) to find a safe corner to hide. Of never finding a safe corner to hide.

Am I hiding from the middle of the night? From my upcoming surgery? From some corner of myself? Am I hiding because these days, I struggle to answer that question: “What will I do with my one wild and precious [work] life?” When I find a way to live my passion, will I also find my safety—and maybe even a restful night of sleep?