Roller Coaster

These days, I feel like my friend’s almost-teenage daughter who says, “I can’t stop crying, and I don’t know why!” I feel like myself at fifteen when I used to slam doors and stomp on stairs and sometimes even scream, “I hate you!” at my mother. I feel like a roller coaster, up and down, round and round; like 100 marbles spilling and spinning on a hard floor; like the site of an alien invasion or a hostile takeover or a tornado.

One day, I’m my happy self. The next, so full of rage I can’t stand to be in my own skin. One hour, sitting in sadness. The next, laughing.

I assume this is the Tamoxifen taking my body by storm. (Tamoxifen blocks the hormones that fed my estrogen and progesterone positive cancer. I’ll be taking it for the next five to ten years–but hopefully adjusting to it much sooner than that!) People have reminded me that I have other good reason to be angry and sad and anxious. (Breast cancer; and months and months of breast cancer treatment.) While I do not doubt that there are many factors at play, whatever is happening with my emotional body somehow feels physical, chemical.

The good news is, I’m not depressed. I feel further and further away from that deep, dark, hole I was in a couple of weeks ago. Sure, I feel a little crazy! Sure, I feel totally at the mercy of the wind. (What new emotion is going to blow in now?) But maybe because I’m not 15 anymore, I’m better able to enjoy the good and let the harder stuff pass on through me. At least, that’s what I’m trying to do.

Several weeks ago, in response to one of my posts, my mom sent me this card.

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In this moment, when the wind is calm, I feel like, “Okay, so I’m a little emotionally unstable these days, I can roll with that.” But when the wind picks a more challenging pace or direction, it does get harder to not kick and scream and fight back.

I’ve been working extra hard (with very mixed results) on letting the wind carry me—working hard not just because of whatever is happening emotionally, but because this is a week of huge transition, and for me, transitions often lead to grasping. To me wanting things to slow down or stop or be a certain way. And so I keep whispering to myself, “Trust. Let go. Trust. Let go.”

Transition #1: The end of school for my kids, which is bittersweet: As always, I welcome summer, but it feels especially hard to let go of 1st and 3rd grades (and of Sophie’s and Harrison’s amazing teachers). As I anxiously anticipated the last day of school (yesterday), I realized that part of my grasping is because I feel I’ve missed out on so much of the school year. And now “poof,” it’s over, my kids are a year older, and we’ll never get this time back.

Transition #2: My parents fly back to California tomorrow. What do I say about my amazing parents? They both put their own lives on hold so Josh and I could move forward with ours. When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer in October, Josh was in his second and final year of an extremely intensive graduate program to become a Physician Assistant. We assumed he’d defer for a year, but instead, my parents moved in with us to take care of the kids and of me through those awful months of chemotherapy and then again for those awful weeks of recovering fromImage 2 surgery. (And today we all screamed with joy because Josh passed his Boards and is now a certified PA! I am in awe of my husband and more in love than ever—what he accomplished amidst my breast cancer, and all of it while also being here for me every step of the way.)

I am also down on my knees grateful to my parents (who are long divorced, by the way, but neither of them could stay away, and so they—we—made it work, beautifully, all of us under the same roof for two months in the winter and another two months this spring). My parents who have been parents to my own children these past months, doing everything that needed to be done for a 6 and a 9 year old. My parents who have helped parent me back to health, doing everything that needed to be done for a 40 year old women with two young children and breast cancer. Thank you, Mama and Poppy.

Transition #3 has been less of a transition and more a time of uncertainty, as I met with various doctors to figure out when and where and for how long I would be doing radiation—and feeling like my life was once again on hold until I figured it all out. Yesterday I got the news: I can do radiation at my local hospital. I start on Monday and will go every weekday for 28 days.

My goal now is to let the wind carry me there and back and wherever else it wants me to go. My goal is to minimize the grasping, the door slamming, the roller coaster rides—but also to try and go easy on myself, knowing it ain’t always easy to keep steady in a storm.

5 thoughts on “Roller Coaster

  1. Hey, Jenny – Yup our bodies can do things that don’t feel good to how we want to feel/be in our bodies – hormones especially (and (pheromones, too!!). Some times our body chemistry makes our brain go wonky – reactive or unable to make simple decisions. It’s simply so. The best you can do is stay in contact with the unmoving core, learn to know it’s constancy and immeasurable depth.

    Congrats to Josh! May he be empowered to be a healer.

    You (plural) sound pretty blessed even if the trolley jumped the tracks a while ago…

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  2. As human beings, not only do we seek resolution, but we also feel that we deserve resolution. However, not only do we not deserve resolution, we suffer from resolution. We don’t deserve resolution; we deserve something better than that. We deserve our birthright, which is the middle way, an open state of mind that can relax with paradox and ambiguity. To the degree that we’ve been avoiding uncertainty, we’re naturally going to have withdrawal symptoms—withdrawal from always thinking that there’s a problem and that someone, somewhere, needs to fix it.

    Pema Chodron

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  3. What a beautiful card — gift, actually — from your mother!

    I suppose if you’re going to ride the wind, sometimes you have to ride the gale, too.

    How could you not weep? How could you not rage? How could you not laugh? How could you not slip into sadness? How not stand in awe of your very survival, and the amazing human beings you describe?

    I’m not sure these are chemical reactions so much as natural, even healthy responses to what’s been happening. Maybe this is how we ride the wind.

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