Pathology Report, Birthdays, Doctors I Adore, and Breast Cancer Be Damned

I realize that a couple of posts ago I wrote about needing radiation without explaining why, which I will attempt to do now. The good news is that the results of my post-surgery pathology report are positive (or so I understand—after getting a medical run-down of the report, I did need to ask, “So, is that good news or bad?”).

As far as the doctors know, they removed whatever cancer remained—and what remained was much smaller than what the MRI showed pre-chemo, meaning I responded well to the chemo. They got “good margins,” meaning there was a good buffer of cancer-free tissue surrounding the extracted, cancerous tissue, reducing concerns about any lingering cancer cells being left behind. There was no cancer in my lymph nodes. There was, however, scarring in one of my lymph nodes, which is a sign that there might have been cancer there before the chemo eradicated it. Which is both good news and bad: good, of course, that the cancer has been eradicated; bad because knowing it might have been in one of my lymph nodes was the tipping point for needing radiation. (Though my understanding now—which was not my understanding in October when Josh and I first met with the radiation oncologist—is that radiation likely would have been recommended regardless, because of how young I am and how wide-spread the cancer was throughout my left breast.) The radiation is meant to kill any free-floating cancer cells that might remain.

What else is going on this week? Pretty much I alternate between tears and rage; bed and couch (or a doctor’s office).

My baby girl (who isn’t a baby anymore) turns 7 on Saturday, and I always make a big deal out of birthdays. But this year, it looks like I won’t be able to pull off very much. On Tuesday night, I was slammed with pain like I hadn’t felt since the hours just after my surgery. As careful as I thought I was being, apparently I overdid it. So I’m back on more or less total bed rest. I must have slept for 20 hours yesterday, all doped up again on pain meds. I’m feeling better physically today but terrified about doing too much and hence 1) postponing my healing even more and 2) missing out altogether on Sophie’s birthday celebrations.

I can’t say that the increased pain, bed rest and narcotics have done much to improve my emotional state.

I saw my oncologist, Dr. Katz, on Tuesday, who is starting me on my 10 years of Tamoxfin. Maybe it won’t be a big deal at all. Or maybe it’ll give me massive mood swings and hot flashes to top off all the other joys of the last seven months.

When I asked about our next appointment, she said she’d see me again in about 3 months. “Three months?!” I exclaimed, with great disappointment. (I would rather 3 weeks. Or 3 days.) I really like Dr. Katz. She is smart and direct and patient and kind and makes me feel like I am not only in the best of hands, but that I am a real-life human being about whom she genuinely cares. I actually look forward to seeing her, which is a big deal, because I can’t think of when else I’ve looked forward to going to the doctor.

Though I might be looking forward to seeing Dr. Parikh, my plastic surgeon, tomorrow. (I say “might” only because I’m pretty sure he’s going to tell me he can’t take out my surgical drain yet, which brings me back to the tears, rage, couch and bed.) I like him as much as I like Dr. Katz: a lot. The first time I met him, he blew apart all my stereotypes about plastic surgeons. He, too, is kind and patient and humane on top of very smart and very good at his job. What ultimately put me at ease about my surgery was knowing he would be in the room with me. (Which is to say nothing at all negative about the surgeon who performed my mastectomy. He, too, struck me as surprisingly kind and gentle for a surgeon—there I am exposing my stereotypes again—and he apparently did an excellent job. I would recommend him (Dr. Arenas) in a heartbeat. But I only met him once, briefly, whereas I met with, emailed with, even ran into Dr. Parikh often; which is why his presence, like Dr. Katz’s, feels like a safe place for me to land these days.)

ImageMy bed is a safe place to land, as well, but I sure am getting sick of it. Why this didn’t happen during chemo, I don’t know. Why I traveled through the first 6 months of treatment feeling more or less okay (and sometimes even strangely wonderful) emotionally, and am now hitting a wall, hard, I don’t know. But that I am: hitting a wall, hard. I am sick of the inside of my house. Sick of being so unavailable to my kids. Sick of feeling crappy. Sick, sick, sick of breast cancer. (Thanks, Greg, for the “screw cancer” poster.)

6 thoughts on “Pathology Report, Birthdays, Doctors I Adore, and Breast Cancer Be Damned

  1. Glad to hear the report was positive. It must feel like at least some kind of a relief to get a little good news, after the dark night of the soul you described in your last post.

    My bad: I was going to respond to that but then my computer went down and I lost the URL and (excuse after excuse…). Your words about resorting to prayer moved me deeply. I’m not very religious but do think — believe, I suppose, which is sort of different from thinking in the rational sense — that prayer and meditation connect us with a larger truth, somehow, and do have the power to pull us out of ourselves. At least sometimes.

    I hope things get better soon. ❤

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    1. Perhaps that is why I hesitated to share about the praying, because neither am I a religious person, and that word “prayer” is so associated with organized religion (for me, at least). But you say it perfectly: that prayer and meditation have the power to connect us with a larger truth, and a larger truth I DO believe in.

      Thank you for your well-wishes. I am rather determined for things to get better soon!

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  2. Hang in there my dear. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Can’t wait to see you tomorrow. Love, Daboo

    Sent from my iPad

    >

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    1. Celebrating Sophie’s birthday together will be a good distraction! I’ve been thinking it’s time to get back to my gratitude practice, and I think being together on Saturday will be a perfect way to start.

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  3. Grief will come to you. Grip and cling all you want, It makes no difference. Catastrophe? It’s just waiting to happen. Loss? You can be certain of it. Flow and swirl of the world. Carried along as if by a dark current. All you can do is keep swimming; All you can do is keep singing. ~ Gregory Orr ~ (How Beautiful the Beloved) And keep writing!

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